Creation of viewpoint images

How are the viewpoint panoramas put together?

As part of the Port Capacity Project's assessment process, 12 viewpoints have been formally examined by independent experts.

Photomontages were composed to compare the existing view and the modified view.

A 70 mm lens on the camera used to take the photos has a picture angle of 26.5 degrees and a horizontal angle of view of around 21.3 degrees.

Four photographs were overlapped by 1/3 to create an image approximately the same as the central cone of view of human vision, i.e. 50-60 degrees horizontal and 15 degrees vertical.

A digital model, or 'wireframe', of the amendment was then laid over each photographic panorama, indicating its location and apparent height and scale.

This approach enabled a consistent, accurate image to be created with minimal lens distortion, avoiding the subtle changes in perspective that can be created by some wide-angle lenses.

Photographs stitched together form a more realistic panorama
Photographs stitched together form a more realistic panorama

Assessment criteria

When measuring visual impact, to be conservative the View Shed and zones of visual influence have been based on the height of the body of the container-unloading cranes at 50 metres.

The View Shed is the area surrounding the Project from which the Project could be discernible. The Project's View Shed, based on a height of the container-unloading cranes, would extend to approximately 6 km from the Project boundary with the zones of visual influence broken down into high, medium, low and insignificant levels of visual impact, as show in Fig.1 below.

View Shed and zones of visual influence
Fig.1. The View Shed and zones of visual influence

The process is based on the parameters of human vision and particularly an individual's central field of vision (see Fig.2 below).

Central field of vision
Fig.2. Central field of vision

Our vertical central field of vision is 10 degrees of our vertical field of vision. If a development takes up 50% or more of the viewer's vertical central field of vision, it is considered to be dominant, and will be rated as having a high level of visual impact.

If it takes up between 25% - 50%, it has a medium visual impact, between 5% and 25% is deemed to have a low visual impact, and less than 5% is insignificant (see Fig.3 below).

Visual impact within central field of vision
Fig.3. Visual impact within central field of vision

There are three main visual components of the Project:

  • The container cranes to load and unload containers from vessels
  • The potential automated container stacking equipment used in the terminal
  • The container stacks

Note, bidders competing for the right to operate the container terminal were required to prepare and lodge visual amenity assessments as part of their bid, including views from neighbouring communities taking into account aspects such as lighting and light spill.

How are the viewpoint panoramas put together?

As part of the Port Capacity Project's assessment process, 12 viewpoints have been formally examined by independent experts.

Photomontages were composed to compare the existing view and the modified view.

A 70 mm lens on the camera used to take the photos has a picture angle of 26.5 degrees and a horizontal angle of view of around 21.3 degrees.

Four photographs were overlapped by 1/3 to create an image approximately the same as the central cone of view of human vision, i.e. 50-60 degrees horizontal and 15 degrees vertical.

A digital model, or 'wireframe', of the amendment was then laid over each photographic panorama, indicating its location and apparent height and scale.

This approach enabled a consistent, accurate image to be created with minimal lens distortion, avoiding the subtle changes in perspective that can be created by some wide-angle lenses.

Photographs stitched together form a more realistic panorama
Photographs stitched together form a more realistic panorama

Assessment criteria

When measuring visual impact, to be conservative the View Shed and zones of visual influence have been based on the height of the body of the container-unloading cranes at 50 metres.

The View Shed is the area surrounding the Project from which the Project could be discernible. The Project's View Shed, based on a height of the container-unloading cranes, would extend to approximately 6 km from the Project boundary with the zones of visual influence broken down into high, medium, low and insignificant levels of visual impact, as show in Fig.1 below.

View Shed and zones of visual influence
Fig.1. The View Shed and zones of visual influence

The process is based on the parameters of human vision and particularly an individual's central field of vision (see Fig.2 below).

Central field of vision
Fig.2. Central field of vision

Our vertical central field of vision is 10 degrees of our vertical field of vision. If a development takes up 50% or more of the viewer's vertical central field of vision, it is considered to be dominant, and will be rated as having a high level of visual impact.

If it takes up between 25% - 50%, it has a medium visual impact, between 5% and 25% is deemed to have a low visual impact, and less than 5% is insignificant (see Fig.3 below).

Visual impact within central field of vision
Fig.3. Visual impact within central field of vision

There are three main visual components of the Project:

  • The container cranes to load and unload containers from vessels
  • The potential automated container stacking equipment used in the terminal
  • The container stacks

Note, bidders competing for the right to operate the container terminal were required to prepare and lodge visual amenity assessments as part of their bid, including views from neighbouring communities taking into account aspects such as lighting and light spill.